Text Resize

  • -A
  • +A
  • Your rating: None (2 votes)

    Adorn Your Projects with Shopmade Banding Part II





    more on woodworking safety

    Tools and Materials

    In Part I of this series, I covered all the intial steps in creating your own shopmade banding--from gluing up the initial block of walnut and maple, to crosscutting and re-orientation, and finally--crosscutting the individual pieces that will come together to form the geometric pattern that will hopefully adorn a piece of furntiure or other project.

    This week, we'll wrap up the process with tips on how to glue the banding together and resaw it into delicate strips that are perfect for inlay.


    How to Make

    String Together Blocks of Maple and Walnutclick to enlarge

    String Together Blocks of Maple and Walnut: I used a simple shopmade glue-up jig composed of a strip of scrap MDF and a hardwood fence to glue each of my maple/walnut blocks together, stringing them end-to-end. Apply glue, rub them together, and press them against the fence. Rinse and repeat. Just be sure to cover the jig base and fence with a bit of tape, to ensure your banding doesn't stick to the jig!

    String Together Blocks of Maple and Walnutclick to enlarge

    Center Core is Now Complete: This is what you should be left with, a long string of small blocks, glued together, to make up the central core of the banding.

    String Together Blocks of Maple and Walnutclick to enlarge

    Attach a Maple Strip: Now apply glue to a thin strip of maple and glue it to the top of the core.

    String Together Blocks of Maple and Walnutclick to enlarge

    Use a Caul and Plenty of Clamps: Set a long hardwood caul atop the maple strip to distribute pressure evenly and clamp up the assembly. Don't skimp on clamps. You want to ensure a nice, clean, gap-free length of banding.

    String Together Blocks of Maple and Walnutclick to enlarge

    Prep the Opposite Face for Glue-Up: Once the glue dries, take off the clamps and flip the workpiece over. You'll need to clean off any excess glue. I had very little. In fact, all I needed to do was hit it quickly with a sanding block to ensure a clean surface for glue in the next step.

    String Together Blocks of Maple and Walnutclick to enlarge

    Glue and Clamp the Opposite Maple Band: Apply glue to a second strip of maple and clamp it to the opposite face, just like before.

    String Together Blocks of Maple and Walnutclick to enlarge

    The Final Banding Block: Once the glue dries, this is what you'll be left with. Notice my maple strips were a hair wider than the core blocks. That will be taken care of in the next step.

    String Together Blocks of Maple and Walnutclick to enlarge

    Flush One Edge: Use a block plane to flush the maple face strips down with the core. Stop planing as soon as you're able to get a shaving that includes both the outer maple strips and the core--you don't want to over-plane and risk throwing the glue-up out of square.

    String Together Blocks of Maple and Walnutclick to enlarge

    Slice Off Your Banding Strips: Now hold the freshly planed (from previous step) edge against the fence at your bandsaw and rip the banding block into thin strips--about 1/16-in. in thickness. I got about 7 strips from my initial glue-up.



    Ed_Pirnik