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    Build a Wine Glass Rack, Part 1






    more on woodworking safety

    Tools and Materials

    You may be accustomed to seeing wine glasses hanging upside-down in restaurant bars, but hanging them in the same manner at home allows for the glasses to dry completely and keeps them from collecting dust in the bowl. Building an inverted wine glass holder for a display case or even making a retrofitted shelf for existing cabinetry is quite simple to do yourself.

    For my application I am adding a shelf to an existing cabinet with 5 slots for glasses. Your application may vary.

    Be sure to check out part II of this project where I'll wrap things up with lessons on how to attach the glass holders to the shelf.
     


    How to Make

    Clean Up Two Adjacent Edgesclick to enlarge

    Clean Up Two Adjacent Edges: I started by taking an oversized piece of ¾ in. plywood and cutting two adjacent sides to give myself a clean edge on both.

    Clean Up Two Adjacent Edgesclick to enlarge

    Tape Tames Tearout: When cutting plywood on the tablesaw, apply tape where the blade will be passing through, on the underside of the panel. This will help to minimize tearout. BONUS TIP: Apply a second piece of tape so that the plywood will still sit flat and the cut will still be made at exactly 90 degrees.

    Clean Up Two Adjacent Edgesclick to enlarge

    Attach Hardwood Edging: Next, I ripped a thin piece of hardwood to cover the front edge of the plywood and glued it on.

    Clean Up Two Adjacent Edgesclick to enlarge

    Cauls Help with Clamping: TIP: You want to make sure that this strip of wood really adheres to the plywood. A simple caul will help distribute clamping pressure evenly.

    Clean Up Two Adjacent Edgesclick to enlarge

    Plane Hardwood Edging Flush: Once the glue is dry, handplane the hardwood edging almost dead flush with the plywood—being careful not to go through the plywood’s fragile top veneer.

    Clean Up Two Adjacent Edgesclick to enlarge

    Sand the Hardwood Edging: Finish up with a sanding block for a super smooth edge.

    Clean Up Two Adjacent Edgesclick to enlarge

    Handplane the Front Edge: Next, I used a handplane to smooth up the front face of the hardwood edging.

    Clean Up Two Adjacent Edgesclick to enlarge

    Cut the Shelf to its Final Dimensions: Now rip and crosscut to size (using the tape trick again).

    Clean Up Two Adjacent Edgesclick to enlarge

    Rip the Angles for the Glass Supports: Next, I cut a 9 degree bevel on either side of the pieces which my wine glass bases would later rest on. To do this safely, I used a magnetic feather board to hold the stock tight against the fence, a conventional push stick to push the stock through the cut, and a small custom-made push block to further secure the work piece against the rip fence as I pushed the cut straight through.

    Clean Up Two Adjacent Edgesclick to enlarge

    Sandpaper Affords You a Better Grip: TIP: I applied sandpaper to the angled area on the custom push block I made. The sandpaper offers a bit of friction and keeps the block from slipping while you’re making the cut.

    Clean Up Two Adjacent Edgesclick to enlarge

    Crosscut Glass Holders to Length: With the bevels cut along the long edges of each glass holder, I crosscut the pieces to length. I begin by first squaring up one end, and then use a stop block to cut all the pieces to a consistent size.

    Clean Up Two Adjacent Edgesclick to enlarge

    Accurately Aligned Pilot Holes: The beveled glass holders need to be shimmed away from the surface of the shelf bottom in order to accommodate the glass bases. I used a simple block of wood, the same length as my beveled pieces. The two components were simply screwed together in countersunk holes. I used double-stick tape to temporarily hold the two pieces together as I drilled my pilot holes. Perfect alignment!
    Be sure to catch part 2 of this series to learn how to wrap this project up with lessons on attaching the glass holders to the shelf.



    LisaRaleigh