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    Build a Wine Glass Rack, Part 2






    more on woodworking safety

    Tools and Materials

    In part 1 of building a wine glass rack I covered making a shelf and glass supports. In Part 2 I’ll walk you through the final assembly.


    How to Make

    Sub Assembly Glue Up click to enlarge

    Sub Assembly Glue Up : With the holes drilled , remove the double-stick tape and spread a thin bead of glue on the bottom side of the shim piece, then screw them together.

    Sub Assembly Glue Up click to enlarge

    Pilot Holes: Now that the sub assembly is ready to go we’ll drill the pilot holes that will attach them to the shelf.

    Sub Assembly Glue Up click to enlarge

    Mark the Sub-Assembly Locations: Next, I evenly spaced the sub-assemblies. I marked their locations by using a nail to punch a small divot through each of the pilot holes.

    Sub Assembly Glue Up click to enlarge

    Extend the Pilot Holes: With these locations marked out, I continue the pilot holes into the bottom side of my shelf.

    Sub Assembly Glue Up click to enlarge

    Assembly: Next, I screwed the sub-assemblies in place. TIP: to help keep the sub-assemblies aligned while screwing them in place, I used a nail in the pilot hole to keep everything in proper registration.

    Sub Assembly Glue Up click to enlarge

    Making the Plugs: Drilling : Because you’ll see this set of screws, you’ll want to cover them up with plugs. I used a 1/2-in. diameter plug cutter--the same diameter as my holes.

    Sub Assembly Glue Up click to enlarge

    Making the Plugs: Detaching: To free these plugs from the board I used the bandsaw. TIP: to keep the plugs from falling to the floor, attac a piece of tape across all of the plugs.

    Sub Assembly Glue Up click to enlarge

    Glue-Up: Apply a small amount of glue to the inside wall of the hole and also to the outer edge of the plug, and pound it into place. Leave it slightly proud of the surface.

    Sub Assembly Glue Up click to enlarge

    Flush the Plugs: To flush the plugs I got rid of most of the waste with a block plane, then a sharp chisel, and finished with some fine sandpaper.

    Sub Assembly Glue Up click to enlarge

    Apply a Finish: For a durable finish I started with a seal coat of de-waxed shellac (often marketed as “Seal Coat”) and then sanded with 320-grit sandpaper. Finally, I followed up with 3 coats of wipe-on polyurethane, sanding between each coat with #0000 steel wool to achieve a satiny, smooth finish.



    LisaRaleigh