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    Router Table Push Stick





    By Peter Schlebecker

    The safest way to get a routed profile on a narrow workpieces to cut the profile on the router table before ripping the stock to final width. Working with wider stock allows you to feed the work past the bit without putting your fingers in harm’s way.

    occasionally, though, you might need to rout a shape onto a piece that’s already quite narrow. Featherboards will help hold the piece firmly to the table surface, but you’ll need a push stick to guide the work snugly against the fence.

    An effective push stick is a simple piece of plywood with a notch cut into one end. The strip lies flat on the router table, with the notch at the trailing end. Two vertical handles, mounted with countersunk drywall screws and glue, make the push stick easy to grab. For the handles, I use scraps from our wood-turning studio, but a large dowel or rounded square stock will do fine.

    (Originally printed in the Sept/Oct 2006 issue of Fine Woodworking magazine (FWW #186))


    Peter_Schlebecker

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    davidalan1122
    davidalan1122 davidalan1122 writes:

    Im no expert, but I believe you just made an excellent point. You certainly fully understand what youre speaking about, and I can truly get behind that.                              linkedin advertising

    mariajustu2
    Maria justu writes:

    I really liked the post that you had shared here about the Router Table Push Stick. I would definitely try this out at my home as I am in need of this one. Also thank you for sharing the images of the same. I have checked out the related article about the same. garcinia cambogia gnc

    mypetshop
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    c4419183
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    patrickchen
    Patrick Chen writes:

    Si vous êtes le genre de personne qui veut regarder riche pour moins cher, ou veut avoir tous les nouveaux jouets sympas, ne j'ai une surprise pour vous! Il ya beaucoup de magasins sur et hors ligne qui portent replique montre Hermes.

    KattyL
    Katy Lewis writes:

    This is probably the best way to avoid cutting your fingers while working with wood. I recently finished building an outdoor table and I must say that the push stick helped me a lot, as much as the abrasive disc from PantherIndustrial.com, which I used to give the table that polished look.

    WoodBear508
    Thomas Filpus writes: If the notch is shallower than the stock, the push stick won't contact the router bit. The second picture shows how the stick does not ride against the fence, but keeps the stock tight to the fence. This may result in tear-out as the bit exits the stock. If you use the push stick to back up the stock to prevent tear out, the notch would be deeper -- to match the stock -- so the plywood base would be sacrificial. In that case, the handles should be attached with screws alone, not glued and screwed.
    professorss
    Sheldon Sanders writes: Isn't the profile going to get the same profile cut inti it? Doesn't that mean that the notch or the entire gas to be replaced when you shift to another profile?
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